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Uhhh, for lack of a better title, haha. Well, this is exactly what it says on the tin. Keep in mind that it's constantly in progress because I have a really bad attention span and can't do all of this in one sitting. Each one will have a little gallery of images that aren't neccesarily related to the media but I like to use as visual inspiration.

Tuck Everlasting

Was actually adapted previously in live-action by Disney little more than a decade ago, didn't do too terrible but was not
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popular. It's a children's book published in 1975, and takes place in the 1880s (Disney's film changes it to 1914). 

Wikipedia: "10 year old [15 in the Disney version] Winnie Foster is tired of her family and is thinking of running away from her rural hometown of Treegap. One day, while in a wooded area her family owns, she meets a boy about the age of 17 drinking from a spring. The boy tells her that his name is Jesse, and he refuses to let Winnie drink the water. Soon after, Jesse's brother Miles and mother Mae take Winnie away with them and explain what is happening and why they did what they did [...]

Mae and her family explain to Winnie that the spring that is on her family's land is a magical spring that grants eternal life to anyone who drinks its water and that they discovered its effects by accident after heading to the Treegap area to try and build a new life for themselves."[1]

I don't want to spoil the book, but it's really good, and the story is basically about immortality. Jesse's family does not ever want anyone to touch the spring because they have come to learn that living forever is not as great as it seems (Jesse's brother's wife took their children and left him because she was horrified and suspicious that he never grew older at all as the years went by). Meanwhile they are unknowingly being watched by a man only ever referred to as the "Man in the Yellow Suit", who had earlier shadily asked Winnie about her family's land. What he is watching for and what are his motives aren't too hard to guess, but aren't revealed until later.

References